You don’t need a Masters Degree in Finance to plan for retirement. Just 10 minutes to watch this tutorial. Saving for retirement is that easy.

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15 replies
  1. Torgo1969
    Torgo1969 says:

    I was encouraged by a client the other day to start an IRA instead of stacking silver and gold. I distrust paper and I fear that the govt can confiscate electronic assets.

    It's hard to argue with someone while you're eating pie in their $450K home, but I trust Cappy.

    Reply
  2. John Smith
    John Smith says:

    Silly rabbit, nobody's going to get to collect their 401K. The government is going to take it. On a positive note, there will always be the Department of Corrections retirement plan.
     

    Reply
  3. Robin of Hood
    Robin of Hood says:

    Thanks Aaron for the advice.  In the Australia the government got 'involved' in retirement pension, called superannuation, and created a whole industry of superannuation financial  'advisors'.  These bozos, who have economic degrees and cannot get a job, this useless third of society will charge a small fortune to tell you need to get into a pension fund. 

    Reply
  4. OrdinaryHuman
    OrdinaryHuman says:

    As a younger person with above average income and minimal expenses from a minimalist lifestyle, I would favor the traditional contributions over the Roth contributions. My post-retirement income is going to be more like $20k (that's all I need to live pretty well), while my current income is more than $60k gross. Even if tax rates shoot up future and the tax policy becomes less favorable for 401ks and IRAs, I'd wager that people with lower incomes (e.g. <$20k) will still have pretty decent tax rates compared to my current marginal rate. After all, it would be wrong for the government to raise taxes on poor people with income that low, or something like that. Gotta tax those rich people more instead. As such, I'd expect people who will retire while expecting relatively high incomes post-retirement are probably going to be shafted the hardest by any tax changes for retirement accounts.

    Bottom line: I'd rather avoid the taxes now and risk getting shafted later than get shafted now and get shafted later. I can't imagine the retirement accounts being treated any less favorably than taxable brokerage accounts anyway – if the government is going to confiscate an IRA or a 401k, they might as well get my brokerage account too while they're at it.

    Reply
  5. The Doctor Mayhem Fun Time Show
    The Doctor Mayhem Fun Time Show says:

    Or you could just do like I'm planning. Work part time until you die. I mean, shit… how long until the government confiscates those 401k plans? How long until Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid collapses? Buy some gold, buy some guns and goods, practice minimalism, and try to keep my work week 30 hours or less. There's a retirement plan.

    Reply

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